All times listed in Eastern time.

Tuesday, April 5

Unwind and gear up for a great day of professional learning with our morning virtual Vinyasa yoga session. Participants will enjoy the free yoga class that is only available to summit attendees.

Bring your coffee and join us for a morning networking session. Pennsylvania Department of Education advisors, Center for Schools and Communities staff, and English Language Development educators who serve in various roles will be in attendance to meet and greet and engage in informal discussion.

Remarks

Noe Ortega, Ph.D., Secretary of the Pennsylvania Department of Education, Harrisburg, PA


What is Translanguaging and What Does it Mean for Teaching?

Ofelia Garcia, Ph.D., Professor Emerita, Ph.D. Programs in Urban Education and Latin American, Iberian, and Latino Cultures (LAILAC), Graduate Center, City University of New York, New York, NY

This presentation will consider how translanguaging theory shifts our understanding of language and bilingualism, as well as its consequences for English language development. Dr. Garcia will examine a case study of how translanguaging theory shapes the actions of a teacher of emergent bilingual students. Based on the performances of this teacher and her students, Dr. Garcia will provide principles of translanguaging pedagogical practices so that teachers can open up translanguaging spaces in the English language classroom.

Construyendo Estudiantes Resilientes: Fostering Social and Emotional Learning

Migrant students and English Learners who are learning a new language while in the process of integrating into a more multicultural sense of being, need to build resilience and develop a growth mindset given the many challenges they may face in today’s school system. This presentation provides strategies and practices for helping migrant students and English Learners develop a growth mindset in a schoolwide setting.

Susan Morris-Rutledge, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Secondary Education, California University of Pennsylvania, California, PA


Empathy and Emotional Capacity-Building for Multilingual Learner Support

This interactive workshop will invite session participants to explore fundamental characteristics of being an empathic community-engaged teacher for sustainable and equitable multilingual learner education. The session will begin with an overview of both foundational and cutting-edge research-supported discussions surrounding teaching and learning for multilingual learner success. The value of cultural and linguistic dissonance for fostering multilingual language teacher empathy and growth will be engaged. Interactive activities will be deployed to assist participants in contextualizing the information to their learners, communities, and classroom practices.

Pauli Badenhorst, Ph.D., Assistant Professor in Teacher Education, Department of Teaching and Learning, The University of Texas – Rio Grande Valley, Edinburg, TX


Enlightening With Experiences

Are you looking for ways to spice up your instruction? Both adults and children are motivated by tasks that excite us! Knowing the interests of your students can be a fantastic tool to engage and inspire all learners. In this session, participants will learn how to create meaningful themed lessons to lower the affective filter and support the delivery of your content in a unique way.

Megan Syed, M.A., Training and Support Coordinator for English Language Learners, Detroit Public Schools Community District, Detroit, MI


Protecting Immigrant Students From Bullying and Harassment

As political rhetoric calls for the building of walls and deportation of immigrants, schools face the challenge of responding to students making similar remarks. Bullying and harassment that targets English Learner students is prohibited under the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Pennsylvania Human Relations Act. This session will provide an overview of schools’ obligations to create and maintain a harassment-free environment under state and federal civil rights statutes. Participants will review scenarios to identify appropriate response steps that school personnel should take to prevent, intervene in, and respond to national origin harassment.

Michelle Nutter, M.Ed., Education and Outreach Program Manager and E&O Civil Rights Outreach Specialist, Office of Public Engagement, Pennsylvania Office of Attorney General, Harrisburg, PA

Bring your lunch and join PDE staff for office hours. During this hour, PDE staff will share any relevant updates or reminders and answer questions from participants. Participants will also have opportunities to engage in discussion with other ELD colleagues.

Bob Measel, Title III Director and Bilingual Education Advisor, Bureau of Curriculum, Assessment, and Instruction, Pennsylvania Department of Education, Harrisburg, PA

Julia Hutton, Bilingual Education Advisor, Bureau of Curriculum, Assessment, and Instruction, Pennsylvania Department of Education, Harrisburg, PA

“False Positives, Re-Entry Programs and Long-Term English Learners” — Undoing Dichotomous Frames in US Language Education Policy

At the core of contemporary US language education policy is the dichotomous dividing of bilingual students into English Learners (ELs) who are entitled to extra support and non-ELs who are not entitled to this extra support, leading to debates about the best criteria to both identify students as ELs and reclassify them as fully English proficient. This presentation will examine the historical development of this dichotomous framing of bilingual students within the remedial framing of the Bilingual Education Act that emerged within the context of the culture of poverty that was informed by the raciolinguistic ideology that suggested racialized communities were verbally deprived. Participants will examine contemporary vignettes that point to the tensions that this ideological underpinning has created for contemporary US language education policymakers and discuss ways of reconceptualizing US language education policy that reject the remedial orientation that has informed this dichotomous framing and is responsive to the tensions reported by these educators.

Nelson Flores, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Educational Linguistics, University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Education, Philadelphia, PA


Helping Students Access, Retrieve, and Retain Academic Vocabulary

This session will develop a deeper understanding of vocabulary knowledge and what it means “to know” a word. Participants will be introduced to powerful strategies and routines that will enable our students to access, retrieve, and retain vocabulary. Participants will spend time throughout the session analyzing our current vocabulary instructional practices using a variety of evidence-based criteria. Participants will leave the session with a plethora of ideas and action steps to implement in their classrooms for accelerating vocabulary growth among students.

Carmen Shahadi Rowe, Ed.D., Founder, Accelerating Language, LLC, Lancaster, PA


Migrant Education 101

In this informative session, participants will receive an overview of the Migrant Education Program (MEP) including eligibility requirements and supplemental services available. A brief history of the MEP will be provided, along with demographic information, using the MEP Referral System and accessing the Migrant Student Information Exchange (MSIX) national database. Information on how to connect to the Migrant Region in your area will be provided, along with practical ways that the MEP has developed a positive and mutually beneficial relationship with ELD departments in school districts.

Lysandra Alexander, J.D., Program Development Coordinator, Migrant Education Program, Pennsylvania Department of Education, Harrisburg, PA

Jose Castro, Student Support Specialist, Migrant Education Program, Millersville University, Millersville, PA

Varquidia Rosario, Student Support Specialist, Migrant Education Program, Northwest Tri-County Intermediate Unit, Edinboro, PA


Social and Emotional Learning and Multilingual Learner Teachers: You Can Do It

Teacher stress and attrition were concerns before the COVID-19 pandemic, and with the significant changes to K-12 education over the past year and a half, teachers are experiencing more occupational stress than ever. This is especially true for teachers of multilingual learners (MLs), a population of teachers who are grossly understaffed and underfunded in most school systems. This interactive, teacher-centered workshop will focus on social and emotional learning (SEL) as it pertains to teacher well-being. The first segment provides an overview of the Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning’s (CASEL) SEL framework, specifically focusing on CASEL’s five SEL competencies. The second segment explores links between the five competencies and popular initiatives pertaining to MLs. Finally, the workshop concludes with approaches to navigating the often grueling demands of teaching MLs, including the importance of teacher self-advocacy, connecting teachers with their deeply held intentions for their MLs, and the importance of self-care.

Kevin Briggs, D.Ed., Coordinator, Center for the Promotion of Social and Emotional Learning, Center for Schools and Communities, Camp Hill, PA

View the documentary film, Refuge in the Heartland, and discuss how educators can best support students who are refugees with limited or interrupted formal education (SLIFE). Refuge in the Heartland chronicles the experiences of refugee students and their families who come to the United States and their interactions with educators, policymakers, and community partners. Produced by K-State College of Education in collaboration with Wichita Public Schools, Kansas, the film discusses topics, such as acculturation, overcoming trauma, curriculum development and instruction, public policy, community response, and language acquisition for culturally and linguistically diverse students.

Wednesday, April 6

Bring your coffee and join us for a morning networking session. Pennsylvania Department of Education advisors, Center for Schools and Communities staff, and English Language Development educators who serve in various roles will be in attendance to meet and greet and engage in informal discussion.

Remarks

Bob Measel, Title III Director and Bilingual Education Advisor, Bureau of Curriculum, Assessment, and Instruction, Pennsylvania Department of Education, Harrisburg, PA


Planning for Equity: Centering English Learners in State and District Education Policy

Julie Sugarman, Ph.D., Senior Policy Analyst for PreK-12 Education, National Center on Immigrant Integration Policy, Migration Policy Institute, Washington, DC

Education policy paves the way from goals and ideals to the day-to-day life of the classroom. But too often, policymakers fail to consider how policies play out for English Learners (ELs) or how a lack of policies can leave educators guessing how to best support these students. In this presentation, we will consider how policies that balance strong guardrails with flexibility promote a consistent and equitable learning environment for ELs, with special consideration for high school newcomers.

NEWLY ADDED!
Culturally Responsive Teaching: From Concept to Classroom Practice

All teachers and students are cultural beings. All curricula, materials, and instructional plans are cultural artifacts. Thus, all teaching is culturally responsive. The question we need to ask is this – to whose culture is my teaching responsive? In this session, we will deep dive into cultural responsiveness as a concept, engage in deep reflection using tools from the presenter, Learning for Justice, and PDE, and explore approaches to enact cultural responsiveness in our teaching practices.

Andrea G. Kolb, Ph.D., Statewide Multilingual Education Program Manager, Center for Schools and Communities, Harrisburg, PA


From Navigating Immigration to Navigating School: Immigrant Families as Key Partners in Promoting Educational Equity

How does a child find themselves leaving their hometown in Mexico, Guatemala, or China to arrive in a classroom in Pennsylvania; and how do we teach and care for them once they become our student? This session will begin by mapping a course through the complex and often cruel realities of the US immigration system, giving participants insight into the experiences their immigrant students may have faced in their journey to the US. A broad overview of our immigration system post-9/11 will lead into a deeper discussion on the current state of asylum and immigration policy, with a particular focus on what is happening at the Southern border. Participants will discuss the needs of Pennsylvania schools and their students, exploring how an innovative parent engagement model created in Chicago could be applied by Pennsylvania teachers, principals, and administrators to promote educational equity and full inclusion of their multilingual students and families.

Marina Burka, M.A., Immigrant Justice Partnerships Program Manager, The Resurrection Project, Chicago, IL


The Trifecta: ELs, the Leaky STEM Pipeline, and Culturally Responsive Teaching

This presentation will define and discuss the Leaky STEM Pipeline, culturally responsive teaching, and its impact on students whose first language is not English. Dr. de Haan will also include strategies that can be used in any classroom and their connection to TESOLs 6 Principles for Exemplary Teaching of English Learners and the Brain.

Darlyne de Haan, Ed.D., Founder of de Haan Consulting, LLC, and Director of Curriculum and Instruction of Math, Science, and STEM, Bridgeton Public Schools, Bridgeton, NJ


UDL: An On-Ramp to Partnering With Teachers to Support Multilingual Learners

In this session, participants will be introduced to Universal Design for Learning (UDL), a framework that proactively supports the variability of all learners, including multilingual learners. We will explore how UDL assists multilingual learners in the content areas through a design process that is efficient, effective, and equitable. Participants will explore ways to collaborate with classroom teachers to intentionally design learning experiences that provide greater accessibility, build students’ capacity to thrive, and take ownership of their learning. This session is for practitioners looking to build their understanding of UDL as well as facilitate collaborative conversations with classroom teachers that lead to student growth and achievement.

Sarah Misner, M.Ed., Project Consultant, Office of Professional Learning, Montgomery County Intermediate Unit, Norristown, PA

Carey Rhodes, M.Ed., Project Consultant, Office of Professional Learning, Montgomery County Intermediate Unit, Norristown, PA

Bring your lunch and join PDE staff for office hours. During this hour, PDE staff will share any relevant updates or reminders and answer questions from participants. Participants will also have opportunities to engage in discussion with other ELD colleagues.

Bob Measel, Title III Director and Bilingual Education Advisor, Bureau of Curriculum, Assessment, and Instruction, Pennsylvania Department of Education, Harrisburg, PA

Julia Hutton, Bilingual Education Advisor, Bureau of Curriculum, Assessment, and Instruction, Pennsylvania Department of Education, Harrisburg, PA

Breathe Life Into Your Lessons With Realia

Are you looking for a way to breathe life into your lessons? Engaging elementary students in language acquisition through the use of realia—authentic, everyday items—elevates lessons from ”good” to ”great”! Realia reinforces vocabulary, builds background, and connects concrete to abstract. Further, it creates memorable language experiences, lowers the affective filter, and triggers use of language outside the lesson. Join us as we look at research, examples, and steps to take to incorporate realia.

Julie Baxa, Ph.D., Professional Learning Specialist, GrapeSEED, Chesterfield, MI

Jodie Shell, M.A., Professional Learning Specialist, GrapeSEED, Harper Woods, MI


Culturally and Linguistically Responsive Teaching: Small-Group Instruction for Multilingual Learners

Discover ways to provide asset-based instruction that responds to the diverse needs of multilingual learners to improve English language proficiency and literacy skills. This research-based session provides multimodal instructional strategies and suggestions for English language and literacy instruction, so students can successfully access grade-level content and accelerate academic progress.

Barbara Andrews, M.A., Senior National Literacy Consultant, Benchmark Education Company, New Rochelle, NY


How to Create a Bilingual Early Learning Ecosystem That is Equitable and Engaging

Only 40% of children nationwide read on grade level by the time they get to 3rd grade. The pandemic has increased the opportunity gap for our most vulnerable students. It is crucial to keep young students engaged, especially during these troubling times. This session will focus on teacher and administrator best practices designed to (1) advance both student engagement and progress toward kindergarten readiness and 3rd grade reading proficiency, (2) engage their community in bilingual early literacy, and (3) give parents the bilingual resources and support they need to be their child’s first and most effective teacher.

This session will provide resources and guidance on how to develop powerful ways to engage your most vulnerable students; blended learning activities that motivate all students, including your English Learners; and partnerships with parents to support blended and at-home learning.

Kathy Maximov, Chief Academic Officer, Footsteps2Brillance, Washington, DC


Monitoring the Language Proficiency of All Students in English and Spanish With LAS Links Progress

This session will focus on strategies employed by Pennsylvanian districts, specifically Allentown School District, who have implemented a targeted formative approach, LAS Links Progress Monitoring (a commercial product offered by DRC), to language assessment and instruction. The strategies include assessing students’ language proficiency multiple times a year and providing stakeholders with professional development to better understand and use the data.

Chelsea Rivera, M.S., Assessment Solutions Consultant, Data Recognition Corporation, Plattsburgh, NY

Andrea Salgado O’Brien, M.A., ESL Facilitator, Allentown School District, Allentown, PA

Michelle Johnston, M.Ed., ESL Facilitator, Allentown School District, Allentown, PA

Thursday, April 7

Unwind and gear up for a great day of professional learning with our morning virtual Vinyasa yoga session. Participants will enjoy the free yoga class that is only available to summit attendees.

Bring your coffee and join us for a morning networking session. Pennsylvania Department of Education advisors, Center for Schools and Communities staff, and English Language Development educators who serve in various roles will be in attendance to meet and greet and engage in informal discussion.

A District’s Growth in D.E.I. During the Pandemic: Courageous Conversations

With the convergence of COVID-19 and the current events of race and racism, Upper Merion Area School District swiftly moved to address the immediate and long-term impact of these circumstances. This interactive workshop will share strategies and action steps for forming and implementing an effective Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion plan. In addition, this workshop will include how a district can reimagine strategies and practices from lessons learned during this past year.

Susan Silver, Ed.D., Assistant Superintendent, Upper Merion Area School District, King of Prussia, PA


The Journey Box Read-Aloud: Promoting Historical Understanding of Marginalized Narratives Through Award-Winning Read-Alouds and the Library of Congress Resources

In this session geared for teachers of elementary students, participants will gain strategies of creating and teaching with “journey boxes” to promote inquiry-based social studies within a literacy curriculum. Journey boxes are a collection of artifacts, photographs, and other primary sources of movements, organizations, figures, or time periods, especially narratives that are often left out of the textbook. It is a way to engage children in inquiry, collecting relevant information from sources, making claims from data, and communicating conclusions. Participants will learn search strategies to use Library of Congress resources to find primary and secondary sources and pair them with award-winning read-alouds. Participants will also gain strategies to create effective inquiry questions, engage kids in discussion around primary and secondary sources and artifacts, and craft “document based questions” (DBQs) to draw students’ attention to the artifacts.

Stephanie Serriere, Ph.D., Professor of Social Studies Education, Indiana University–Purdue University Columbus, Columbus, IN


Leading for Equitable Access for Students in K-12 ELD Programs

District and school leaders play a pivotal role in designing programs for multilingual learners. We will consider program design through the integration of language activities within content lessons. We will also suggest the importance of regular collaboration between ESL specialists and content teacher colleagues. We will offer sample teacher toolkits emphasizing dynamic student needs across grade-level bands.

Joe DiLucente, M.S.Ed., Education Consultant (ESL), English Language Starts, Irwin, PA

Susan McKeever, M.S.Ed., Education Consultant (ESL), English Language Starts, Irwin, PA


Using Biographies and Leveraging Assets to Support Reading Instruction for Multilingual Newcomers

This session explores the planning and implementation components for novel reading lessons for our recently arrived immigrant English Learners (RAIELs), using their biographies and culturally responsive teaching to engage, motivate, and encourage students to reach content and language goals. Examples of lessons and student products will be shared. Be prepared to soar into a “Can Do,” positive, asset-based experience.

Esperanza Wickert, Founder and President, Helping Other Professionals Excel (H.O.P.E.) Consulting Services, LLC, Reading, PA

Building Capacity to Support English Learners and Your ESL Program: A Look at How PVAAS Can Support Your Work

The Pennsylvania Value-Added Assessment System (PVAAS) is a powerful tool to assist educators in planning instruction as well as developing and allocating resources to best meet the needs of students, including your English Learners. It can also be a valuable tool, when used with other data, in helping to evaluate and assess your ESL services. This session will focus on (1) analyzing the impact of your ESL program with several key PVAAS reports and (2) supporting student-level goal setting and determining supports for your English Learners with PVAAS student-level data.

Jennifer L. Ross, M.A., Educational Specialist II and PVAAS Statewide Team for Pennsylvania Department of Education, Lancaster-Lebanon Intermediate Unit 13, Lancaster, PA

Laurie Kolka, M.A., Assessment Specialist and PVAAS Statewide Team for Pennsylvania Department of Education, Lancaster-Lebanon Intermediate Unit 13, Lancaster, PA


Building Virtual Engagement Across Borders: Benefits to Multilingual Learners

Educators in today’s K-12 classrooms are concerned with the instruction of content and language skills that are shaped by the global mobility of people, ideas, and modes of communication. We will explore virtual exchange as a vehicle to build students’ understanding of ways in which language and culture are intimately a part of their identities in classrooms, communities, and schools. After reviewing an overview of research findings to highlight the value as well as challenges of virtual engagement across boundaries and borders, we will engage in classroom activities that can be integrated into everyday instruction with multilingual learners and can also be a focus of virtual exchange. At the conclusion of the session, we will provide resources to establish your own virtual exchanges to benefit multilingual learners.

Elizabeth Smolcic, Ph.D., Teaching Professor, Second Language Education, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

Soyoung Sarah Han, Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Curriculum and Instruction, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA


Emphasizing Meaningful Collaboration for Multilingual Learners With Disabilities

We will provide a framework for structuring district-level teams to support multilingual learners (MLs) with disabilities, focusing on the roles of various administrators, ESL specialists, and content teachers. We will highlight academic interventions with a language and literacy focus while addressing the need to differentiate between language and literacy acquisition from disability. We will consider cognition and brain-based strategies as a thread throughout these themes. These formats will lead to a decision-making protocol to determine whether a ML’s academic needs are related to a learning disability or second-language acquisition. Additionally, we will address varying levels of support for dually enrolled students based on an individual student’s dynamic needs.

Joe DiLucente, M.S.Ed., Education Consultant (ESL), English Language Starts, Irwin, PA

Susan McKeever, M.S.Ed., Education Consultant (ESL), English Language Starts, Irwin, PA


Engaging in Critical Teacher Action Research to Advance Educational Equity for Multilingual Learners

This session will begin with an overview of Critical Teacher Action Research (C-TAR) within an educational framework. Then, participants will be asked to select and join a breakout room where they will hear from Pennsylvania teachers who engaged in a semester-long C-TAR project as part of their graduate coursework at Arcadia University.

Breakout Room Topics

All presenters are graduate students at Arcadia University, Glenside, PA

Culturally Responsive Teaching and the Use of Multicultural Literature to Facilitate Dialogue, Engagement, and Belonging in Early Childhood and K-12 Education

Rasheda Muhammad, Jake Adams, and Kathleen Biddle

Implementing Culturally Responsive Behavior Redirection to Reframe and Reduce Disruptive Classroom Behavior in Early Elementary Education

Frances Bass and Dominique Perry

Representations of Immigrant and Refugee Experiences in Children and Adolescent Literature

Allison Haughey and Devon Newman


Using Nonfiction Literature to Support Multilingual Learners

During this session, participants will explore the use of nonfiction literature to support and enhance instruction for multilingual learners and discuss research-based criteria to evaluate nonfiction literature for quality and accuracy. Materials will be provided to assist in making educated material selections. Participants will also identify strategies to incorporate nonfiction literature to augment instruction for multilingual learners’ development of academic language and background knowledge. Participants will collaborate to create an action plan for implementing nonfiction literature that represents a variety of style, type, and representation.

Cindy Barnes, ELD Program Specialist, Springfield School District, Springfield, PA

Bring your lunch and engage in discussion with special guest Joelma Monteiro. She is a 2021-2022 recipient of a Humphrey Fellowship, a one-year program funded by the U.S. Department of State that brings international professionals to the United States for academic and professional development. Joelma is an English language teacher and classroom director at Instituto Nacional de Petroleos in Angola. She will be working with Center for Schools and Communities’ English Language Development team this spring examining strategies to support and promote quality English language instruction in Angola.

Bob Measel, Title III Director and Bilingual Education Advisor, Bureau of Curriculum, Assessment, and Instruction, Pennsylvania Department of Education, Harrisburg, PA

Julia Hutton, Bilingual Education Advisor, Bureau of Curriculum, Assessment, and Instruction, Pennsylvania Department of Education, Harrisburg, PA

Closing Remarks

Brian W. Campbell, Director, Bureau of Curriculum, Assessment, and Instruction, Pennsylvania Department of Education, Harrisburg, PA


Giving a Chance to a Refugee

Makaya Revell, M.A., Founder, Marie Mambu Makaya Foundation and Peace Promise Consulting, York, PA

Makaya Revell’s story starts in the seaport city of Matadi in the Democratic Republic of Congo and leads all the way to York, Pennsylvania. Fleeing for his life after police killed half of his family, Makaya silently boarded a ship and crossed the Atlantic Ocean as a stowaway before the ship captain handed him over to Immigration Services in the United States. As a 16-year-old seeking political asylum, Makaya had none of the rights afforded U.S. citizens. Even though he feared being killed if he returned to the Congo, the U.S. government would not grant him asylum. He was moved from a detention center to the foster care system in Philadelphia, and when he was 18, he was sent to York’s Friendship House, which takes in children in need. At 19 years old, he met his adoptive parents who empowered Makaya to continue his fight for justice for himself and for others. His story details the ways in which his U.S. family and teachers helped him use his experiences to turn his imagined future into a reality. He credits them for helping him develop skills in critical thinking, strategic action, and advocacy, which led him to build a life as a human rights activist and leader in both U.S. and Congolese societies. In this keynote address, Makaya will share his story – the journey from being moved to a U.S. detention center to completing graduate school to becoming an international leader in human rights activism and the role that education and educators had in empowering him along the way.